20% off our Year Round Walks range. Use discount code YEARROUND20 at checkout. 

{"id":9377195853,"title":"Lancashire Railways The History of Steam","handle":"lancashire-railways-the-history-of-steam","description":"\u003cp\u003eIn this well-researched and highly readable book, local author Mark Jones offers a feast of nostalgia as he tells the story of Lancashire's railways in their heyday.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cmeta charset=\"utf-8\"\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eLancashire has always counted itself among the pioneer of Britain's railway network. As early at 1826 George Stephenson was appointed to build the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. From the beginning, though, the county's railways were constructed not for the purpose of passenger traffic but to move freight, principally coal, direct from the mines to its customers.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eAs the demand for coal expanded to power the ever-increasing new industrial machines so the need for good railway connections grew to match it. By the mid 1850s some 250,000 navvies were working across the county on railway projects.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eOne of the early locomotive works was founded by Charles Tayleur, a Liverpool engineer, at Newton-le-Willows in the 1830s. His Vulcan foundry gained a world-wide reputation and even built 2,750 locos for the rapidly expanding Indian railways.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBy the 1860s the golden age of passenger travel had begun. Excursion trains became particularly popular, especially for sporting events such as the Grand National at Aintree. Blackpool was also a regular destination. A total of 195,000 passengers arrived on 207 incoming trains on August Bank Holiday Monday in 1910.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBut the arrival of motorised transport saw the end of an era. Now, all that is left of the days of steam are the preserved railways. The East Lancashire Railway runs trains from Rawtenstall and the Ribble Steam Railways has a base at Preston Docks.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eA5 (landscape) 96 pages\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eAuthor: Mark Jones\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eISBN 9781846742989\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2017-03-18T20:54:00+00:00","created_at":"2017-03-18T20:56:04+00:00","vendor":"Countryside Books","type":"Books","tags":["Age of steam","By region_Lancashire","Lancashire railways","local history of Lancashire","Railways"],"price":995,"price_min":995,"price_max":995,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":34347525645,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Lancashire Railways The History of Steam","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":995,"weight":200,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":null,"inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":"9781846742989"}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1819\/1457\/products\/Lancs_Rail_Cover_300_res.jpg?v=1518246131"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1819\/1457\/products\/Lancs_Rail_Cover_300_res.jpg?v=1518246131","options":["Title"],"content":"\u003cp\u003eIn this well-researched and highly readable book, local author Mark Jones offers a feast of nostalgia as he tells the story of Lancashire's railways in their heyday.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cmeta charset=\"utf-8\"\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eLancashire has always counted itself among the pioneer of Britain's railway network. As early at 1826 George Stephenson was appointed to build the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. From the beginning, though, the county's railways were constructed not for the purpose of passenger traffic but to move freight, principally coal, direct from the mines to its customers.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eAs the demand for coal expanded to power the ever-increasing new industrial machines so the need for good railway connections grew to match it. By the mid 1850s some 250,000 navvies were working across the county on railway projects.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eOne of the early locomotive works was founded by Charles Tayleur, a Liverpool engineer, at Newton-le-Willows in the 1830s. His Vulcan foundry gained a world-wide reputation and even built 2,750 locos for the rapidly expanding Indian railways.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBy the 1860s the golden age of passenger travel had begun. Excursion trains became particularly popular, especially for sporting events such as the Grand National at Aintree. Blackpool was also a regular destination. A total of 195,000 passengers arrived on 207 incoming trains on August Bank Holiday Monday in 1910.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eBut the arrival of motorised transport saw the end of an era. Now, all that is left of the days of steam are the preserved railways. The East Lancashire Railway runs trains from Rawtenstall and the Ribble Steam Railways has a base at Preston Docks.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eA5 (landscape) 96 pages\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eAuthor: Mark Jones\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp style=\"text-align: justify;\"\u003eISBN 9781846742989\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Lancashire Railways The History of Steam

Product Description

In this well-researched and highly readable book, local author Mark Jones offers a feast of nostalgia as he tells the story of Lancashire's railways in their heyday.

Lancashire has always counted itself among the pioneer of Britain's railway network. As early at 1826 George Stephenson was appointed to build the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. From the beginning, though, the county's railways were constructed not for the purpose of passenger traffic but to move freight, principally coal, direct from the mines to its customers.

As the demand for coal expanded to power the ever-increasing new industrial machines so the need for good railway connections grew to match it. By the mid 1850s some 250,000 navvies were working across the county on railway projects.

One of the early locomotive works was founded by Charles Tayleur, a Liverpool engineer, at Newton-le-Willows in the 1830s. His Vulcan foundry gained a world-wide reputation and even built 2,750 locos for the rapidly expanding Indian railways.

By the 1860s the golden age of passenger travel had begun. Excursion trains became particularly popular, especially for sporting events such as the Grand National at Aintree. Blackpool was also a regular destination. A total of 195,000 passengers arrived on 207 incoming trains on August Bank Holiday Monday in 1910.

But the arrival of motorised transport saw the end of an era. Now, all that is left of the days of steam are the preserved railways. The East Lancashire Railway runs trains from Rawtenstall and the Ribble Steam Railways has a base at Preston Docks.

A5 (landscape) 96 pages

Author: Mark Jones

ISBN 9781846742989

£9.95
Maximum quantity available reached.